Arts, Health and Well-being

Arts in Health philosophy

Arts Access International has always been interested in and interactive with Art in Health programmes, in New Zealand, United Kingdom, Australia, with the World Health Organisation (WHO) and has addresses many conferences and workshops on the subject.

The philosophy is based on a holistic view of health that stresses that balance is necessary in social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being for someone to be healthy.

The Art in Health programmes have been two fold.

First the need of everyone to be able to express themselves and that may be through music, dance, visual arts, theatre and that this expression of oneself is part of health.

The second part is the work with the health environment, hospitals, clinics and medical facilities.  These are wonderful places for art, especially if that art makes the atmosphere of the health facility feel comfortable rather than clinical.

Our underlying hypothesis in this work is that the way as individuals we each look outwards from within ourselves at the outside world around us, influences our perception of the external environment different places, people and what goes on in the world and in turn, what we choose to contribute in it and how, reciprocally, what goes on in the external environment and how it is undertaken impacts on our senses and influences our thoughts, feelings, attitudes and personal behaviour.

Both Penny Eames and Robin Philipp have address numerous conferences international on these topics and both have also written books to stimulate people to engage in the arts for health movement

penny.eames@paradise.net.nz    or      Robin.Philipp@UHBristol.nhs.uk

Well-being at work :   The AESOHP Programme and its Comfort Projects.  

A Progress Report of work in the Centre for Health in Employment and the Environment (CHEE), Bristol Royal Infirmary, in support of initiatives for ‘Core Public Health Standards’. August 2007.  Author: Dr Robin Philipp

Health and Well-Being Work Groups have been formed in many Healthcare Trusts including the United Bristol Healthcare NHS Trust (UBHT). This report outlines the background, key publications, collaborations and current initiatives in support of well-being at work of the Centre for Health in Employment and the Environment, (CHEE), Bristol Royal Infirmary.

Health and Well-Being Work Groups have been formed in many Healthcare Trusts. In the United Bristol Healthcare NHS Trust (UBHT), the Group, under its former Chair, Linda Billington, Business Manager, Avon Partnership Occupa­tional Health Service, NHS Plus (APOHS), sought proposals from within APOHS for help with its audit, research, educational development and information dissemination interests.

This report outlines the background, key publications, collaborations and cur­rent initiatives in support of well-being at work of the Centre for Health in Employment and the Environment, (CHEE), Bristol Royal Infirmary. Further details and relevant publications to date are available from Robin Philipp.

Download the full pdf  document:    Well-being at work AESOHP Programme

     For further information email:    Robin.Philipp@UHBristol.nhs.uk

A Report for colleagues of the UNUM Provident Centre for Psychosocial and Disability Research, Cardiff University

“Happiness and Resilience at Work Conference” held at the Royal College of Physicians, London ‚14 September 2006. Author: Robin Philipp. This report summarises a day conference at the Royal College of Physicians which looked at elements of life satisfaction, the psychosocial aspects of happiness and the role played by work.

Download paper here      Happiness Resilience at Work Conference paper

For further information email:   Robin.Philipp@UHBristol.nhs.uk

 

An Update Report for Arts Access International and the University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust

Working Group on Staff Health and Well-being: February 2008.  Author: Robin Philipp (Prepared in partnership with the Philipp Family Foundation).

This report comes from the Bristol, UK office of Arts Access International (AAI) where an interest in medical humanities complements the Arts Access International focus on cultural well-being. It includes definitions of health and well-being, including that of the New Zealand Local Government Act (2002) which describes four components of well-being: environmental, social, cultural and economic which must be addressed in sustain­able development. It reports on the progress of projects concerned with the roles of the arts and humanities in well-being, health, medicine and humanitarian work, which explore ways in which the arts can be used to help bridge the needs of patient-centred and evidence-based medicine

   download paper   Arts health well-being Paper

Arts Access International has offices in Bristol, England and in Kapiti Coast, New Zealand.

This has encouraged discussion and collaboration  lead by Dr Robin Phillip.  February 2005.

For further information email: Robin.Philipp@UHBristol.nhs.uk

Strengthening United Kingdom – New Zealand Strategies for Arts and Health

A paper for discussion with the Hon. Judith Tizard, MP, Associate Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage, New Zealand Government, the Hon. Helen Clark, Prime Minister & Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage, New Zealand Government, and Dr. David Chaplow, Director of Mental Health Services, Ministry of Health, New Zealand.  Author: Robin Philipp.

The attached paper explores some aspects of the interdependence of:

  •  mental health and emotional well-being;
  • sustainable economic development;
  • ways of engaging in creative endeavour to express and communicate thoughts, feelings and emotions;
  • roles of aesthetic appreciation in helping to derive pleasure, enjoyment and happiness and through this a sense of well-being;
  • how engaging with works of art and in the arts can influence health

The paper is in three parts.  It outlines key points in collaborations since 1994 between the United Kingdom and New Zealand for the arts and health. Recent steps taken to help strengthen the collaborations are explored.  Present work is cited and suggestions for possible next stages are given.

Download the full paper here:

For further information email: Robin.Philipp@UHBristol.nhs.uk

 

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